Your Audience is King. Or Queen. Or Your Main Source of Funding.

Most of the time, writing projects are fun.

And then there are projects that are, well … not …really.

Don’t get me wrong, writing is never just all fun and games. It doesn’t matter how much you love writing, how much you are interested in and excited about a particular story you are writing, you will always struggle at some point or another (unless you are my friend Timewalkerauthor … I am not sure he *ever* struggles with writing anything, or at least it never seems that way :P).

Usually, I am facing one or more (mostly all) of the following issues:

  1. I don’t know how to start or what to write about (happens every time I want to blog)
  2. I started but have no idea how to continue (this is particularly interesting when your characters maneuver themselves in a position that will inevitably get them killed or at least imprisoned for life, which cuts the story rather short)
  3. Not writing enough detail (but it was in my head, so why do I …. oh, wait … readers are not mind-readers)
  4. Writing too much detail (who am I kidding, that never happens to me)
  5. Having to rewrite the intro or the end (never waste too much time on these until you are happy with the rest of the piece)
  6. Wanting to keep a scene/piece which absolutely does not need to be there (just keep it in your “for later use” file)

The aforementioned project was … how shall I put it … excruciating. Which was made worse by the fact that it was something I had to write for work. Like many other projects funded by the U.S. government, ours is required to produce various reports over the lifetime of the contract. This year, one of the topics we are reporting on in our annual report is Knowledge Management (KM), aka my domain at work.

I was pretty sure that this report (or lack of my writing progress … #1 from the list above: check) would either get me fired or make me quit.

Eventually, I managed to buckle down and write. And write. And write.

64 pages later: I am still here! I committed everything we’ve done in the past 2 ½ years, KM-wise, to paper. In great detail (#4: check. Charles, you would be proud of me!).

Of course, I was promptly informed that this is simply too much. I didn’t shoot the messenger, but I certainly felt like it.

Whereas overcoming/dealing with #1 – 6 is hard enough, I can always, always add another item to whatever project I am working on: 7. Having a hard time tailoring content to a specific audience.

Sounds simple. Isn’t. At least not for me. When it comes to describing (and, to a certain extent, justifying) my work, no detail is too small. No screenshot useless. No description too technical. After all, at the end of the day, I am somewhat proud of what we’ve accomplished, and I want people to know!

And here I was worried about not having written too much. Haha … -.-

I’m actually not sure what is worse: Having to add content or cutting content. Luckily, I have a co-worker who’s been writing/editing this particular report for years, so she went through and made suggestions on what to cut (“Really, you want that to go??”), what to summarize (“But, but … my details!”) and what to rephrase (“How’s that too negative, it’s the truth!”) and what to elaborate on (“But I thought too many details … never mind.”).

She’s right, of course. Every audience is different, and content needs to fulfill their needs. So, next time you write something, ask yourself: What message do I want to get across? What is my audience interested in? In the case of this report, our client is probably not interested in how taxonomies are implemented in SharePoint, or how the different parts work together. Rather, they want to know why we use the system, how it makes the project and its work more efficient and effective, and how it can potentially save money. So, after a few revisions, the chapter now consists of 30 pages. All the content is there, but it does paint a picture for one particular audience.

Getting everything on paper was not a waste of time though. In November, I’ll be speaking at the 2017 KMWorld conference in Washington, D.C. My presentation about “SharePoint Development, Successes, & Future Plans at The DHS Program” is part of the conference’s SharePoint Symposium. I don’t have the entire presentation down just yet, but I can already say two things: It won’t be a PowerPoint presentation (Death by PowerPoint anyone?), and the tone will be entirely different than that of the recent report. That does not mean though that it will be easier, of course.

How do you make sure that your content is tailored to an audience? I’d love to hear ideas!

P.S. Even writing a decent blog post about this report was excruciating!

Writing Series: Blogging for Work, Blogging for Life

Description:

Why blog? Blogging can help you build your presence in the professional community, grow your expertise on topics of professional and personal interest, expand your career options, develop professional connections, and satisfy your creative spirit. Our three panelists will share their blogging journey and what they’ve learned along the way. Whether you’ve never written a blog post before or you’re a seasoned blogger, this program will provide insight and inspiration from three very different perspectives.

When: Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 6-8pm (6-6:30 pizza, drinks, and networking). Presentations and virtual viewing will begin at 6:30.

Where: LexisNexis, 1150 18th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036 (closest metro stations: Farragut North and Farragut West) and virtually via GoToMeeting

Price:
Onsite: Retired/Student/Unemployed: $5, SLA member $10, Non-member $15
Virtual: SLA member: $5, Non-member $15

Registration: Click here. Virtual attendees must also register through GoToMeeting at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/597015152

Moderator: Elizabeth Lieutenant, M.S.L.I.S. Candidate and Graduate Assistant, Catholic University of America

Panelists:

Marie Kaddell, M.L.S., M.S., M.B.A.
Senior Information Professional Consultant
LexisNexis

Marie has been blogging since 2000. She authored a personal blog for 8 years, sharing the funny side of life for a working mom living in suburbia. In 2006 she took her blogging skills to work and started the Government Info Pro blog as a resource for government librarians. Recently, she took her blogging skills to a whole new place – an author blog: Make Mine Paranormal. Writing under her maiden name, Marie Michelle Coleman, Marie recently released the first book in a paranormal romance/urban fantasy series – Bespoken. Her blog serves as part of her author platform. Marie will be presenting on workplace blogging and the strategic use of your blogging experience.

Aileen M. J. Marshall, MLIS, MA
Knowledge Management/Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist
The DHS Program/ICF International

Aileen has been blogging since 2010, about a year after she started Library School. Blogging about traditional librarianship at first, she branched out when she discovered her passion for non-traditional librarianship. About four months ago, she re-designed and transitioned her blog Picturesque to reflect her personal writing: She is currently working on her first Science Fiction novel and shares experiences about writing and editing a story/manuscript, among other things. She also just started a new blog called A Journey Towards Health And Beauty, which chronicles her experiences switching to cruelty-free, organic and mostly vegan personal care and other products as well as lifestyle changes. Aileen will be presenting on the challenges of finding your own voice and branding your blog.

Christian I. J. Minter, MLIS
National Library of Medicine Associate Fellow
Welch Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

Christian has been blogging for six years. She is the author of two personal blogs: Silver Blades & Pink Slippers shares her experience as an adult figure skater, and Climbing the Stacks chronicles her adventures in the world of librarianship. Christian will be presenting on utilizing blogging as a student and new librarian, and finding the balance in sharing your personal and professional life online.